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Easy, STRESS FREE way to BREAK 100 in golf!

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how to break 100

As a golfer, breaking a hundred can be a significant milestone in your game. In this article, I will share some simple tips that are guaranteed to help you achieve this goal. Before diving into the tips, it’s important to understand the concept behind it. A typical golf course has a par of 72, meaning you are allowed to shoot 27 over par. This translates to nine double bogeys and nine bogeys, which is crucial for some of the tips I will discuss later in this article. By playing within yourself and avoiding big mistakes, you can be on track to breaking a hundred.

One of the first tips I want to share is about saving shots around the green. Sometimes, taking the safer shot rather than the flashy one is key to shooting a lower score. I will discuss a shot that you need to learn and get good at because it will really help you. Additionally, I will discuss accepting three putts and playing par threes effectively. Lastly, I will share a tip on adjusting your mindset on difficult holes. Keep reading to learn more about these tips and how they can help you break a hundred.

Understanding the Concept

As I mentioned earlier, breaking 100 on a golf course is achievable if you understand the concept behind it. A standard golf course has a par of 72, which means you are allowed to shoot 27 over par, or have nine double bogeys and nine bogeys. This is important to keep in mind because it means you can still break 100 as long as you avoid making huge mistakes and keep the big numbers off your scorecard.

One tip to help you shoot a lower score is to save shots around the green. Sometimes, taking the safer shot rather than the sexy shot is the key. For example, instead of using a 60-degree club to flick the ball up in the sky, you can use a pitching wedge to get a little bit of loft and use a putting stroke to land the ball near the front of the green. The goal is to keep the ball on the putting surface and avoid big numbers on your scorecard.

Another important tip is to manage your expectations when it comes to putting. Three putts are okay in certain situations, especially when you are far away from the flag. It’s better to have a three-putt than a four-putt or a five-putt, so don’t be too hard on yourself if you can’t sink the ball in two strokes.

Part threes are a great opportunity to get close to the green or even make a par, but they can also lead to big numbers if you’re not careful. Before you pull a club, take a few seconds to figure out where you want to finish your golf shot. Avoid trouble by aiming for the middle of the green or hitting one extra club to stay away from the trouble at the front of the green.

Finally, it’s important to change your mindset when it comes to the hardest holes on the golf course. Instead of trying to make par, turn it into a par six and aim for a double bogey. This will help you avoid big numbers and stay on track to break 100. And remember, while it’s important to learn how to hit a driver, it’s not necessary to break 100. Focus on keeping the ball in play and avoiding big mistakes.

Tip One: Saving Shots Around the Green

Technique for Shorter Shots

When it comes to saving shots around the green, taking the safer shot rather than the sexy one is key to shooting a lower score. As a better player or someone watching on tour, you may see a tour player or a really good player grabbing loads of loft, the 60-degree club, and almost flicking it up in the sky, landing on the front of the green and rolling it towards the flag. However, that’s ambitious, and if that goes wrong, it could be disastrous.

Instead, I recommend going with your pitching wedge because it’s going to give you a little bit of loft, and the swing that you need for this type of shot isn’t going to be a massive length swing. Technique-wise, grip down on the golf club a little bit for a bit more control, keep the stance narrow, and use almost a putting stroke. Don’t use your wrist too much; simply use your arms and the club as one unit.

Objective of the Short Game

The objective of the short game is to get the ball on the green, and give yourself a decent chance for a putt. Our best result here is to get it on the green, and if it runs too long, that’s okay. It’s not the end of the world. What we don’t want to see is a ball landing or finishing too short or going all the way through the green. Pick a point at the front of the green, and it doesn’t matter if it rolls too far. Our objective is to keep it on the putting surface.

Remember, three putts are okay in certain situations. For example, if you’re a long way away from the flag, three putting is not the worst case in the world. It’s better than a four put or a five put. Manage your limitations and expectations, and if you get the speed wrong, don’t underestimate whether the putt is uphill or downhill. Spend a little time working out the gauge of speed and what sort of length stroke you’re going to need to get it as close to the hole as possible.

Tip Two: Accepting Three Putts

Managing Expectations on the Green

As I mentioned earlier, when trying to break 100, it’s important to manage your expectations on the green. Sometimes, it’s okay to accept a three-putt, especially if you’re far away from the flag. In fact, three-putting from a long distance is better than four-putting or five-putting. So, don’t beat yourself up if you don’t get it close on your first putt.

Assessing Putt Distance and Slope

When you’re far away from the flag, it’s important to assess the distance and slope of the green. Don’t just focus on whether the putt is left-to-right or right-to-left, but also consider whether it’s uphill or downhill. This will affect the speed and length of your stroke. Take a couple of practice putts to gauge the speed and length of your stroke before attempting the actual putt.

It’s also important to keep track of your putts throughout the round. Ideally, you want to aim for 36 putts or less for a full 18 holes. This is a good side target to help you break 100.

Remember, managing your expectations and assessing distance and slope can help you accept three-putts and improve your overall score.

Tip Three: Playing Par Threes Effectively

Trouble Avoidance on the Tee

Before teeing off on a par three, take a moment to analyze the hole and figure out where you want to finish your shot. If there’s trouble at the front of the green, aim for the middle or back. If there’s trouble at the back, aim for the front. Remember, the objective is to avoid making a big number on a par three. Tee the ball up just a touch off the ground for a perfect lie. If the hole is long, don’t be afraid to take an extra club. The key is to stay away from trouble and eliminate the risk of a big number. Finally, it’s important to change your mindset on difficult holes. Instead of trying to make par, aim for a double bogey and you’ll be well on track for breaking 100. While it’s important to learn how to hit driver, it’s not necessary to do so to break 100. Focus on playing smart and avoiding trouble to achieve your goal.

Tip Four: Adjusting Mindset on Difficult Holes

Approaching High Stroke Index Holes

When playing a round of golf, it’s important to remember that some holes are going to be more difficult than others. These high stroke index holes can often be intimidating and cause golfers to make mistakes. However, it’s important to adjust your mindset when approaching these holes. Instead of trying to make par or birdie, focus on making bogey or double bogey. By doing this, you can avoid the big numbers that can ruin your round.

Equipment Considerations

Another way to adjust your mindset on difficult holes is to consider your equipment. While it’s important to have a driver in your bag, it’s not necessary to use it on every hole. On high stroke index holes, it may be better to use a club that you are more comfortable with, even if it means sacrificing distance. By doing this, you can ensure that you are putting yourself in the best position to make a good score.

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AUTHOR

Tommy is a confirmed golf fanatic. He's been playing golf for 20 years and just loves everything about the game. His dad used to play golf a lot and watch the PGA and European Tours, so Tommy started watching too. Now he knows a lot about golf and loves to coach people and help them play better.

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