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Chipping and Pitching Tips: Improve Your Short Game with These Expert Techniques

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chipping and pitching tips

Chipping and pitching are two essential shots in golf that can make or break your game. As a golfer, I have found that mastering these shots can help me save par and improve my overall score. In this article, I will share some of my favorite chipping and pitching tips and techniques for chipping and pitching that have helped me improve my game.

To start, it’s important to understand the difference between chipping and pitching. Chipping is a low-flying shot that is used when you are close to the green and need to get the ball onto the putting surface. Pitching, on the other hand, is a higher-flying shot that is used when you need to get the ball over an obstacle or onto the green from a greater distance. Understanding the differences between these shots and when to use them is key to improving your game.

Mastering the swing, perfecting your stance, grip, and shaft control, and understanding ball position and contact are all important aspects of chipping and pitching. In the following sections, I will provide tips and techniques for each of these areas to help you improve your game and lower your score. By implementing these tips and practicing regularly, you too can become a confident and skilled chipper and pitcher.

Key Takeaways

  • Understanding the differences between chipping and pitching is key to improving your game.
  • Mastering the swing, perfecting your stance, grip, and shaft control, and understanding ball position and contact are all important aspects of chipping and pitching.
  • By implementing these tips and practicing regularly, you too can become a confident and skilled chipper and pitcher.

Understanding Chipping and Pitching

As a golfer, mastering the short game is crucial for lowering your scores. Two essential skills in the short game are chipping and pitching. In this section, I will explain what chipping and pitching are, the differences between them, and when to use each technique.

Chipping

Chipping is a short game stroke where the ball is hit with a lofted club and travels through the air for a short distance before rolling on the ground towards the hole. The objective of chipping is to get the ball onto the green and rolling towards the hole as quickly as possible.

When chipping, it is essential to keep your weight forward on your front foot and use a putting-like stroke. This technique helps to keep the ball low and rolling on the ground. It would be best if you also aimed to hit the ball with a descending blow to create backspin, which will help the ball stop quickly on the green.

chipping and pitching tips

Pitching

Pitching is a short game stroke where the ball is hit with a lofted club and travels through the air for a more extended period before landing on the green and rolling towards the hole. Pitching is used when the ball needs to travel over an obstacle, such as a bunker or a water hazard, or when you need more control over the ball’s stopping distance.

When pitching, it is essential to use a more significant swing than chipping, allowing the clubhead to create more loft and backspin on the ball. It is also essential to keep your weight forward and accelerate through the ball to create more power and distance.

When to Use Each Technique

Knowing when to use chipping or pitching is crucial to developing a successful short game. In general, use chipping when the ball is close to the green and needs to roll towards the hole. Use pitching when the ball needs to travel over an obstacle or when you need more control over the ball’s stopping distance.

Mastering chipping and pitching is essential to improving your short game and lowering your scores. Remember to keep your weight forward, use a putting-like stroke for chipping, and a more significant swing for pitching. Knowing when to use each technique will help you become a more confident and knowledgeable golfer.

Mastering the Swing

As a golfer, mastering the swing is essential to improving your chipping and pitching skills. A good swing is the foundation of a successful shot, and it all starts with proper form and technique.

When it comes to the swing, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, focus on your motion. Your swing should be smooth and fluid, with a steady tempo from start to finish. Avoid jerky or rushed movements, as these can throw off your aim and result in poor shots.

Next, pay attention to your downswing and backswing. Your backswing should be controlled and deliberate, with your arms and club moving together in a fluid motion. On the downswing, focus on shifting your weight forward and driving through the ball with your hips and legs.

For a full swing, make sure to use your entire body and not just your arms. This will give you more power and accuracy, allowing you to hit the ball farther and more accurately.

When it comes to chipping and pitching specifically, it’s important to adjust your swing accordingly. For shorter shots, you’ll want to use a more controlled swing with less power. This will help you finesse the ball onto the green and avoid overshooting your target.

Mastering the swing takes time and practice. But by focusing on your form, tempo, and technique, you can improve your chipping and pitching skills and become a more confident and successful golfer.

Perfecting the Stance

When it comes to chipping and pitching, the stance is critical. A solid stance can help you maintain balance and control throughout your swing, leading to more accurate shots. Here are a few tips to help you perfect your stance:

  1. Feet Position: I start by positioning my feet slightly open to the target. This helps me to create a natural path for the clubhead to follow.
  2. Hip Position: Next, I make sure that my hips are centered over my feet. This helps me to maintain balance throughout my swing.
  3. Center of Gravity: I also make sure that my center of gravity is slightly forward, towards my front foot. This helps me to create a descending blow on the ball, which is critical for a good chip or pitch shot.
  4. Posture: Finally, I check my posture. I make sure that my spine is straight, and my weight is evenly distributed between my feet. This helps me to maintain a consistent swing plane and make solid contact with the ball.

By following these simple tips, you can improve your stance and take your chipping and pitching game to the next level. Remember to practice regularly and stay committed to perfecting your technique.

Grip and Shaft Control

When it comes to chipping and pitching, grip and shaft control are crucial for consistent shots. Here are some tips on how to get a solid grip and control the shaft:

Grip

I prefer to use the reverse overlap grip, where my left hand is positioned normally on the club, and my right hand overlaps with the left, with the pinky finger of my right hand resting between the index and middle fingers of my left hand. This grip allows for better control and stability during the swing.

Another important aspect of the grip is hand placement on the handle. I like to have my hands slightly ahead of the ball at address, which helps to create a descending blow and crisp contact with the ball.

Shaft

Controlling the shaft is key to controlling the trajectory and spin of the ball. For chip shots, I like to have the shaft leaning slightly forward at impact, which helps to create a lower trajectory and less spin.

For pitch shots, I adjust the shaft angle depending on the shot I want to hit. If I want a higher trajectory and more spin, I’ll have the shaft more vertical at impact. If I want a lower trajectory and less spin, I’ll have the shaft leaning forward more.

Hands

The position of your hands at impact can greatly affect the outcome of your shot. For chip shots, I like to have my hands slightly ahead of the ball at impact, which helps to create a descending blow and crisp contact with the ball.

For pitch shots, I adjust the position of my hands depending on the shot I want to hit. If I want a higher trajectory and more spin, I’ll have my hands more behind the ball at impact. If I want a lower trajectory and less spin, I’ll have my hands slightly ahead of the ball at impact.

Handle

The position of your hands on the handle can also affect the outcome of your shot. For chip shots, I like to have my hands closer together on the handle, which helps to create a more controlled and compact swing.

For pitch shots, I like to have my hands farther apart on the handle, which allows for a wider swing and more power. However, it’s important to maintain control and not let the clubhead get too far behind you during the swing.

By focusing on grip and shaft control, you can improve your chipping and pitching and become a more consistent player around the greens.

chipping and pitching tips

The Art of the Chip Shot

Chipping is an essential skill in golf that requires precision and control. A chip shot is a short shot that is meant to hit the ball high in the air, but with minimal roll when it lands on the green. It is usually played from just off the green, and the goal is to get the ball as close to the hole as possible.

To execute a chip shot properly, I always start by selecting the right club. A 52- to 56-degree wedge is perfect for a basic chip shot. It is also important to choose the right target. I usually aim for a spot on the green that is relatively flat and has some room for the ball to roll.

Next, I focus on my setup. I position the ball in the center of my stance and get my weight forward so that my left shoulder is over my left foot. This helps me to make solid contact with the ball and get the ball up in the air quickly. I also keep my hands ahead of the ball to create a descending blow at impact.

When it comes to the chipping stroke, I keep it simple and smooth. I use a pendulum-like motion with my arms and shoulders, and I try to keep my wrists firm throughout the stroke. This helps me to maintain control and consistency. I also make sure to follow through after impact to ensure a clean strike.

Finally, I pay attention to the roll of the ball after it lands on the green. I want to make sure that the ball rolls smoothly and stays on line with my target. To achieve this, I adjust the loft and speed of my chip shot based on the conditions of the green.

In summary, the art of the chip shot requires a combination of precision, control, and technique. By selecting the right club, choosing the right target, focusing on setup and stroke, and paying attention to the roll of the ball, I can execute chip shots with confidence and consistency.

Executing the Pitch Shot

When it comes to executing a pitch shot, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, you want to make sure you have the right club for the job. A wedge with a high amount of loft and bounce is ideal for getting the ball up in the air and stopping it quickly on the green.

Next, it’s important to focus on your ball position. For most pitch shots, you want the ball positioned slightly back in your stance, closer to your right foot (for right-handed golfers). This will help you strike down on the ball and create the necessary backspin for a high, soft landing.

When it comes to your swing, you want to keep things simple and smooth. Start with a narrow stance and a slight knee bend, and focus on rotating your body around your front side as you swing back and through. Keep your hands and wrists quiet, and let the loft of the club do the work for you.

One of the keys to executing a successful pitch shot is controlling your ball flight. Depending on the situation, you may want a high, soft shot that lands softly and stops quickly, or a lower, running shot that rolls out farther. Experiment with different trajectories and see what works best for you.

Finally, it’s important to stay focused and committed to the shot, especially when you’re trying to get up and down for par. Take your time, visualize the shot you want to hit, and trust your swing. With a little practice and confidence, you’ll be hitting great pitch shots in no time.

Drills to Improve Your Game

As a golfer, I know that chipping and pitching are essential skills to master if you want to improve your game. Here are a few drills that I have found helpful to improve my chipping and pitching:

The Phil Mickelson Drill

Phil Mickelson, one of the greatest golfers of all time, has a unique drill that he uses to improve his short game. To perform this drill, place a tee in the ground about two feet in front of your ball. Your goal is to hit the ball over the tee and land it softly on the green. This drill helps you focus on hitting the ball high and soft, which is essential for good chipping and pitching.

The One-Handed Drill

The one-handed drill is a great way to improve your touch and feel around the greens. To perform this drill, grip your club with only your lead hand and hit some chip shots. This drill forces you to use your wrist and feel the weight of the clubhead, which will help you develop a better feel for your short game.

The Clock Drill

The clock drill is a classic drill that helps you develop better distance control with your wedges. To perform this drill, imagine that the hole is at the center of a clock face. Place a ball at the six o’clock position and hit a shot with your wedge. Then, move to the seven o’clock position and hit another shot. Continue around the clock, hitting shots from each position. This drill will help you develop a better sense of how far you hit each wedge and improve your distance control.

These are just a few drills that I have found helpful to improve my chipping and pitching. By incorporating these drills into your practice routine, you can improve your short game and lower your scores on the course.

Understanding Ball Position and Contact

When it comes to chipping and pitching, understanding ball position and contact is crucial for success. Proper ball position can help you achieve the right trajectory and spin, while contact determines the distance and accuracy of your shot.

I always start by assessing the lie of the ball and the distance to the target. From there, I can determine the appropriate ball position. For chipping, I typically play the ball in the center of my stance, while for pitching, I move the ball slightly forward towards my front foot.

Once I have the ball position set, I focus on making solid contact with the ball. When chipping, I aim to hit the ball first and then the ground, creating a small divot after the ball. This allows me to control the spin and trajectory of the ball, giving me more accuracy and consistency.

When pitching, I focus on hitting down on the ball, compressing it against the clubface. This creates more backspin, which helps the ball stop quicker on the green. I also aim to strike the ball in the center of the clubface, which produces a more consistent and predictable shot.

Remember, the type of ball you use can also affect your ball position and contact. Different golf balls have varying levels of spin and compression, which can impact your shot. Be sure to experiment with different balls to find the one that works best for your game.

Mastering Distance Control

As a golfer, mastering distance control is essential for improving your chipping and pitching game. Here are a few tips that can help you achieve better distance control:

1. Selecting the Right Club

Choosing the right club is crucial for controlling the distance of your chip shots. When selecting a club, consider the distance you need to cover, the height of the shot, and the amount of spin you want to put on the ball. For example, if you need to cover a short distance with a low trajectory, consider using a pitching wedge. If you need to cover a longer distance with a higher trajectory, consider using a sand wedge.

2. Using the Right Technique

Using the right technique can help you control the distance of your chip shots. Keep your weight on your front foot, and keep your hands ahead of the ball at impact. This will help you hit down on the ball and create a lower trajectory. Additionally, use a shorter backswing and follow-through to control the distance of your shot.

3. Practicing Your Shots

Practicing your chip shots is essential for mastering distance control. Set up a practice area with different targets and practice hitting shots with different clubs and trajectories. This will help you develop a feel for the distance you need to cover with each club.

4. Reading the Green

Reading the green is crucial for controlling the distance of your chip shots. Consider the slope of the green, the speed of the green, and the grain of the grass when selecting your club and technique. For example, if the green is sloping downhill, consider using a lower trajectory shot to control the distance.

By following these tips, you can master distance control and improve your chipping and pitching game. Remember to practice regularly and experiment with different techniques and clubs to find what works best for you.

The Role of Loft and Spin

When it comes to chipping and pitching, understanding the role of loft and spin is crucial. As I’ve learned through my own experience, mastering these two elements can help you hit more accurate and consistent shots around the green.

Loft is the angle of the clubface, which determines the trajectory of the ball. The higher the loft, the higher the ball will go. When chipping, it’s important to choose the right club with the appropriate loft for the shot at hand. For example, a 60-degree wedge will provide more loft and height than a 52-degree wedge, which will produce a lower, more running shot.

Spin, on the other hand, refers to the backspin or topspin put on the ball. Backspin creates more lift and stops the ball quickly on the green, while topspin produces a lower, more running shot. To create backspin, it’s important to strike the ball cleanly with a descending blow, while a more level strike will produce topspin.

One way to add spin to your chip shots is to use a ball with a softer cover, which will allow for more grip and spin on the clubface. Another technique is to open the clubface slightly at impact, which will increase the loft and spin on the ball.

The Importance of the Follow-Through

As a golfer, I know that the follow-through is a crucial part of chipping and pitching. It is the final part of the swing, and it can make all the difference between a good shot and a bad one. In this section, I will explain why the follow-through is so important and provide some tips on how to improve it.

First and foremost, the follow-through helps to ensure that the ball goes in the direction you want it to. If you stop your swing too early, the ball may not travel as far as you intended, or it may veer off course. By following through, you give the ball the extra push it needs to reach its target.

Another benefit of a good follow-through is that it can help you maintain your balance. When you swing, your weight shifts from one foot to the other. If you don’t follow through, you may end up off-balance and have difficulty recovering for your next shot. By following through, you can keep your weight centered and avoid any unnecessary movements.

To improve your follow-through, there are a few things you can do. First, make sure you are swinging through the ball and not stopping short. Imagine that you are hitting the ball with a hammer and that you need to follow through to drive the nail into the ground.

Second, try to keep your head down and your eyes on the ball throughout the swing. This will help you maintain your focus and ensure that you make solid contact with the ball.

Finally, practice, practice, practice. The more you work on your follow-through, the more natural it will become. Take some time to hit balls at the driving range and focus on following through on each shot. With time and effort, you will see significant improvements in your chipping and pitching game.

The follow-through is a crucial part of chipping and pitching. It helps to ensure that the ball goes in the right direction, maintain your balance, and improve your overall game. By following the tips I’ve provided, you can improve your follow-through and become a better golfer.

chipping and pitching tips

Addressing the Golf Ball

Addressing the golf ball properly is crucial when it comes to chipping and pitching. Here are a few key things to keep in mind:

  • Stance: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and slightly open to the target. Your weight should be evenly distributed on both feet, with a slight bias towards your front foot.
  • Ball Position: Position the ball in the center of your stance for most chip shots. For longer pitches, move the ball slightly forward in your stance.
  • Club Selection: Choose a club with enough loft to get the ball in the air, but not so much that it will fly too far. For chip shots, a wedge with 50-60 degrees of loft is ideal. For pitches, a loft of 45-50 degrees is usually sufficient.
  • Grip: Grip the club with your hands close together and your thumbs pointing straight down the shaft. Your grip should be firm but not too tight.
  • Alignment: Align your body and clubface squarely to the target. Your feet, hips, and shoulders should be parallel to the target line.
  • Posture: Bend forward from the hips with a straight back. Your arms should hang naturally from your shoulders, and your knees should be slightly flexed.

By addressing the ball correctly, you set yourself up for a successful chip or pitch shot. Take the time to get it right, and you’ll see the results in your game.

The Triangle Technique

When it comes to chipping, one of the most important things to keep in mind is the triangle between your arms and shoulders. This triangle is created when you set up to the ball and should be maintained throughout the entire swing. Keeping the triangle intact will help you create a consistent and repeatable chipping motion.

To set up for the triangle technique, start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your weight evenly distributed. Next, place the ball in the middle to forward in your stance. Then, take your normal grip on the club and move your hands down the grip until your hands are close to the clubhead. This will help you maintain control and feel throughout the swing.

Once you are set up, focus on keeping the triangle intact throughout the swing. This means that your arms and shoulders should move together as a unit, with the clubhead staying low to the ground. As you swing through the ball, your hands should remain in front of the clubhead, which will help you create a descending blow and get the ball up in the air quickly.

The triangle technique is a simple but effective way to improve your chipping and get the ball closer to the hole. By maintaining the triangle between your arms and shoulders, you will be able to create a consistent and repeatable motion that will help you get up and down more often. So the next time you’re out on the course, give the triangle technique a try and see how it can improve your chipping game.

The Shallow Angle Approach

When it comes to chipping and pitching, one of the most important things to keep in mind is the angle of attack. A shallow angle of attack is key to hitting solid, crisp shots that roll out nicely on the green.

To achieve a shallow angle of attack, I like to focus on keeping my hands ahead of the ball at impact. This helps to deloft the club and create a more shallow angle of attack. I also try to keep my weight slightly forward throughout the swing, which helps to promote a descending blow and a shallow angle of attack.

Another key to achieving a shallow angle of attack is to make sure you are bottoming out your swing in the right spot. If you are hitting behind the ball or taking big divots, it may be a sign that you are bottoming out too early. Conversely, if you are hitting thin or topping the ball, you may be bottoming out too late.

To find the ideal bottom of your swing, try placing a tee in the ground just in front of the ball. Focus on hitting the ball first and then taking a divot that starts just after the tee. This will help you to find the ideal bottom of your swing and achieve a more consistent, shallow angle of attack.

Achieving a shallow angle of attack is key to hitting solid, crisp chip and pitch shots that roll out nicely on the green. By focusing on keeping your hands ahead of the ball, keeping your weight slightly forward, and finding the ideal bottom of your swing, you can improve your chipping and pitching and lower your scores on the course.

Working with the Green

When it comes to chipping and pitching, working with the green is essential. The green is the area where the hole is located and is usually the smoothest part of the course. Here are some tips for working with the green:

  • Read the Green: Before you even approach the green, take the time to read it. Look for any slopes, bumps, or other features that could affect the ball’s trajectory. Once you have a good idea of the green’s layout, you can plan your shot accordingly.
  • Aim for the Flag: When you’re chipping or pitching, your goal is to get the ball as close to the hole as possible. One way to do this is to aim for the flag. This will give you a specific target to aim for and increase your chances of hitting the ball where you want it to go.
  • Use the Bounce of the Club: The bounce of the club is the curved part of the sole that contacts the ground. When you’re chipping or pitching, you can use the bounce of the club to your advantage. By opening the clubface slightly, you can increase the bounce and prevent the club from digging into the ground. This will help you get the ball up in the air and onto the green.
  • Avoid the Blade: One of the biggest mistakes golfers make when chipping or pitching is hitting the ball with the leading edge of the club (also known as the blade). This can cause the ball to shoot across the green or roll too far. To avoid the blade, focus on hitting the ball with the middle or back of the clubface.

Working with the green takes practice, but with these tips, you’ll be well on your way to improving your chipping and pitching game.

The Role of the Leading Edge

As a golfer, I understand the importance of the leading edge when it comes to chipping and pitching. The leading edge is the part of the clubface that makes contact with the ball first. It’s a critical component of the club that can make or break your shot.

The leading edge plays a crucial role in determining the trajectory and spin of the ball. If you hit the ball with the leading edge pointing down, it will create a low trajectory with little spin. Conversely, if you hit the ball with the leading edge pointing up, it will create a high trajectory with more spin.

When chipping, it’s essential to use the leading edge properly to avoid chunking or blading the ball. You want to strike the ball with the leading edge just above the ground, using the bounce of the club to glide through the turf. This technique creates a smooth, consistent shot that lands softly on the green.

It’s important to note that the leading edge can vary depending on the type of club you’re using. Wedges typically have a more pronounced leading edge than other clubs, making them ideal for chipping and pitching. However, you can still use the leading edge of your other clubs to create a similar effect.

In summary, the leading edge is a critical component of your club that can have a significant impact on your chipping and pitching game. By using it correctly, you can create consistent, accurate shots that land softly on the green.

Understanding Strokes and Flight

As a golfer, understanding the differences between chipping and pitching strokes is essential to improve your short game. Both strokes are used to get the ball in the air, but they have different trajectories and distances.

Chipping Stroke

The chipping stroke is a short, low-trajectory shot that is used when the ball is close to the green. It is similar to a putting stroke, but with a slightly longer backswing and follow-through. The goal of a chip shot is to get the ball in the air for a short distance and then let it roll towards the hole. Chipping is a precise stroke that requires a lot of control and accuracy.

Pitching Stroke

The pitching stroke is a longer, higher-trajectory shot that is used when the ball is farther away from the green. It involves a longer backswing and follow-through than a chip shot, and the ball travels higher in the air. The goal of a pitch shot is to get the ball in the air for a longer distance and then have it land softly on the green. Pitching requires more power and speed than chipping, but it is also more forgiving.

Flight

The trajectory of the ball is an essential aspect of both strokes. When you chip the ball, it should fly low and land on the green with minimal spin. This will allow it to roll towards the hole. When you pitch the ball, it should fly high and land softly on the green with a lot of spin. This will help the ball stop quickly and prevent it from rolling too far past the hole.

Understanding the differences between chipping and pitching strokes is crucial to improve your short game. Both strokes require different techniques and trajectories, but with practice, you can master them and become a better golfer.

The Left Side Approach

When it comes to chipping and pitching, I always approach the shot with my weight forward and most of my weight on my left side. This technique helps me to make solid contact with the ball and control the trajectory and distance of the shot.

By positioning my weight forward, I ensure that my left shoulder is over my left foot, which helps me to create a descending blow and strike the ball first before the ground. This technique also helps me to avoid hitting the ball thin or fat, which can lead to inconsistent shots.

In addition to my weight being forward, I also position the ball slightly forward in my stance, closer to my left foot. This allows me to make a more natural swing and helps me to ensure that I am hitting down on the ball.

The left side approach helps me to make solid contact with the ball and control the trajectory and distance of my shots. By positioning my weight forward and the ball forward in my stance, I can create a descending blow and strike the ball first before the ground, which leads to more consistent and accurate shots.

The Importance of Solid Contact

As a golfer, I know that solid contact is crucial when it comes to chipping and pitching. It is the foundation of a good short game and can make the difference between a birdie and a bogey.

Solid contact is achieved when the clubface strikes the ball in the center of the clubface. This creates a clean, crisp shot with the correct amount of spin and trajectory. When the ball is struck off-center, it can lead to mishits, inconsistent shots, and lost strokes.

To achieve solid contact, it’s important to focus on the fundamentals of your swing. Here are a few tips that can help:

  • Keep your eyes on the ball throughout the swing. This helps ensure that you make contact with the ball in the center of the clubface.
  • Maintain a steady tempo and rhythm throughout the swing. This will help you make consistent contact with the ball.
  • Keep your weight forward and your hands ahead of the ball at impact. This helps ensure that you make contact with the ball before the ground.
  • Practice with different clubs to get a feel for how they impact the ball. This can help you develop a sense of how to make solid contact with each club.

Remember, achieving solid contact is not just about hitting the ball hard. It’s about making a clean, precise strike that produces the desired result. By focusing on the fundamentals and practicing regularly, you can improve your short game and lower your scores.

Chipping and Pitching Tips for Golfers

As a golf instructor, I have found that chipping and pitching are some of the most challenging aspects of the game for many golfers. However, with a few tips and some practice, you can improve your short game and lower your scores.

One of the most important things to focus on when chipping and pitching is your feel. You want to have a sense of how the ball will react when it lands on the green and how it will roll. This comes with practice and experience, but you can also improve your feel by paying attention to the conditions of the course, such as the slope and speed of the greens.

Another key aspect of chipping and pitching is keeping your arms relaxed and maintaining a consistent tempo throughout your swing. Tension in your arms can lead to inconsistent shots, so try to keep them loose and relaxed. Additionally, a consistent tempo will help you make solid contact with the ball and control the trajectory and spin.

When chipping, it’s important to use the bounce of your club to your advantage. This means letting the clubhead slide along the ground and using the loft of the club to pop the ball up onto the green. To do this, focus on keeping your hands ahead of the ball at impact and making a descending strike.

Finally, when pitching, it’s important to vary the trajectory and spin of your shots to suit the conditions of the course. This can be achieved by changing the position of the ball in your stance, altering the angle of your clubface, and adjusting your swing length and speed.

By focusing on feel, keeping your arms relaxed, using the bounce of your club, and varying your shots, you can improve your chipping and pitching and take your short game to the next level.

Bonus Tip – For the most comprehensive guide on chipping, including flop shots, bump and runs, and bunker shots, see our golf chipping page and chipping vs pitching page.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some easy chipping techniques?

If you’re looking for easy chipping techniques, try the “bump and run” shot. To do this, use a low-lofted club and hit the ball just like you would a putt, but with a slightly longer backswing. This shot will help you get the ball rolling on the green faster, instead of trying to fly it all the way there.

What are some golf chipping tips for seniors?

Senior golfers may have trouble generating as much power as they used to, but that doesn’t mean they can’t still be effective chippers. One tip is to use a higher-lofted club, which will help get the ball in the air more easily. Additionally, seniors should focus on maintaining good balance throughout the shot, which will help ensure a consistent strike.

What are some chipping drills for consistency?

One chipping drill for consistency is to use a towel or small object as a target and aim for it from different distances. This will help you get a feel for how much power you need to put behind each shot. Another drill is to focus on hitting the ball with the center of the clubface, which will help ensure a consistent strike.

How can I make pitching in golf easy?

To make pitching in golf easier, try using a more lofted club and focusing on a shorter backswing. This will help you generate more height and spin on the ball, which will help it stop faster on the green. Additionally, try to keep your hands ahead of the ball at impact, which will help ensure a clean strike.

What are some chipping drills for distance control?

One chipping drill for distance control is to use different clubs for different distances and practice hitting to a specific spot on the green. Another drill is to vary the length of your backswing and follow-through to get a feel for how much power you need to hit the ball different distances. See our full guide on chipping distance control

What are some chipping practice games?

One chipping practice game is to play “HORSE” with a partner, where you take turns choosing a target and trying to hit it. Another game is to play “closest to the pin,” where you hit several shots to a specific spot on the green and see who can get closest to the pin. These games can help make chipping practice more fun and engaging.

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AUTHOR

Tommy is a confirmed golf fanatic. He's been playing golf for 20 years and just loves everything about the game. His dad used to play golf a lot and watch the PGA and European Tours, so Tommy started watching too. Now he knows a lot about golf and loves to coach people and help them play better.

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